EDUCATIONAL MATERIAL


Amblyopia (Lazy Eye)

Lazy eye is poor vision in an eye that did not develop normal sight during childhood. Lazy eye is also called amblyopia.

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Astigmatism is irregular shape of the cornea or lens.  Normally, the cornea and lens are smooth and curved equally in all directions, helping to focus light rays sharply onto the retina.  However, if your cornea or lens is not smooth and evenly curved, this results in unclear vision.

Blepharitis is a common and chronic condition where the eyelids become swollen, with oily particles and bacteria. This condition causes irritation, itchiness, redness, and stinging or burning of the eyes.  Warm compresses and lid scrubs are the mainstay of therapy.

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Blocked tear duct

A blocked tear duct is when the eye’s drainage system for tears is either partially or completely obstructed. Tears cannot drain normally, causing a watery, irritated or chronically infected eye.

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Cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye that affects vision. Most cataracts are related to aging.   Cataract surgery is the most common and most successful surgery performed in the US.

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Dermatochalasis is a condition in which there is a redundancy of the skin of the upper eyelids. It is often associated with a protrusion of fat through a defective orbital septum. In severe cases it may obstruct vision. Treatment is surgical.

Dry Eyes is a common condition that is a result of inadequate tears or poor quality tears.  There are many causes of dry eyes including age, side effect of oral medication, or systemic disease.

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Glaucoma is an eye disease in which the normal fluid pressure inside the eyes slowly rises, leading to vision loss-or even blindness. Open-angle glaucoma is the most common form of the disease.

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Diabetic retinopathy is a disease where high blood-sugar levels from diabetes cause damage to blood vessels in your retina.   Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent vision loss, and it is important to maintain control of your blood sugar if you have diabetes.

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Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease that blurs the sharp, central vision you need for “straight-ahead” activities such as reading, sewing, and driving. AMD affects the macula, the part of the eye that allows you to see fine detail. AMD causes no pain.

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Floaters: You may sometimes see small particles of the vitreous (the gel that fills the eye) called floaters.  It is important to have your eyes examined right away when you develop new floaters to detect a retinal tear or detachment.

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Flashes of light: When the vitreous gel pulls on the retina, you may see what looks like flashing lights. It is important to evaluate for a retinal tear or detachment.

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Ptosis

Ptosis is when the upper eyelid droops, sometimes restricting or blocking vision.

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Strabismus

Strabismus is a visual problem in which the eyes are not aligned properly and point in different directions. One eye may look straight ahead, while the other eye turns inward, outward, upward or downward.

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Pinguecula and Pterygium

Pinguecula and Pterygium are common, non-cancerous growths on the cornea and conjunctiva likely caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, dry eye and wind and dust.

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